News

 

Monday, July 25, 2016

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has selected Argonne National Laboratory to lead a consortium of university, private sector and national laboratory partners for a new, medium- and heavy-duty truck technical track under the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) Truck Research Utilizing Collaborative Knowledge (TRUCK) program.

The multidisciplinary consortium, includes Cummins Inc., Freightliner Custom Chassis Corporation, Ohio State University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, and the University of Michigan. 

Friday, July 22, 2016

Coal plant shutdowns are the beginning of the end of an era

Michigan Radio, feat. Mark Barteau

Consumers Energy in April closed seven of its coal-burning units.

DTE Energy plans to shut eight of its coal-burning units by the year 2023.

Mark Barteau is Director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.  He says eventually, coal is going away because natural gas, wind and solar are more cost-effective - as well as being better for public health and the planet.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Consumers Energy in April closed seven of its coal-burning units.

DTE Energy plans to shut eight of its coal-burning units by the year 2023.

Mark Barteau is Director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.  He says eventually, coal is going away because natural gas, wind and solar are more cost-effective - as well as being better for public health and the planet.

Friday, July 15, 2016

The future of biofuel isn’t corn-it’s algae

Pacific Standard, feat. John DeCicco

When they hear “biofuel,” people tend to assume you’re talking about corn. That makes sense, given that corn is anticipated to provide 80 percent of this year’s ethanol production — much more, say, than algae — until we consider a few numbers.

Friday, July 08, 2016

The Democrats’ climate change conundrum

The Christian Science Monitor, feat. Barry Rabe

Climate change is a top liberal priority, but that very urgency is making the issue divisive as much as unifying for Democrats.

A wide rift has opened over a basic question: Just how ambitious should the Democratic Party be in trying to reduce carbon emissions and stabilize Earth’s climate?  

Friday, July 01, 2016

Here’s what your July 4 road trip means for the climate

Climate Central, feat. John DeCicco

When an expected record-breaking 36 million Americans take their holiday road trips this Fourth of July weekend, they’ll be part of what is quickly becoming our nation’s biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions — transportation.

Thursday, June 30, 2016
Imagine you have planted a big garden, from seed, in your backyard to supplement your family’s diet. Maybe you will sell the extra vegetables at the farmer’s market. It’s hot, time-consuming work, but it’s growing well, and every day you think about the dinners you’ll cook for your family and friends, or what you’ll purchase with the money you make. But you’re not the only one noticing your garden, and a neighborhood rabbit starts nibbling on it. You buy live-capture traps, or maybe you build a fence. You try to save your plants, but the rabbit keeps coming back. Now imagine that the rabbit is 15,400 pounds.
Friday, June 24, 2016

Volkswagen agrees to pay billions to drivers over emissions scandal

The Washington Post, feat. John DeCicco

Volkswagen has agreed to pay $10.2 billion to settle its U.S. emissions scandal case, according to the Associated Press, citing two anonymous people briefed on the matter, in what would be one of the largest payouts by an automaker in history.

Friday, June 17, 2016

How electric vehicles can boost new markets

Fortune, feat. Mark Barteau

Here’s a look at the future of energy.

Monday, June 13, 2016

If EVs are critical to significantly reducing or eliminating carbon dioxide emissions from automobiles over the next three decades – and I believe they are – we need to think about ways to appeal to desires and interests not only of consumers, but of public and private institutions with a stake in our energy and transportation systems. In short, we should extol EVs not for their low-carbon virtue, but as a way to create and to satisfy demand in both the electricity and transportation sectors.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Climate warming sometimes-but not always-benefits insect pests

University of Michigan News

As the world warms, outbreaks of plant-eating insect pests are expected to intensify, largely because warmer temperatures favor the pest's biology while boosting growth of the plants they eat.

Several studies suggest that climate warming may be a big benefit to plant-eating pests at high latitudes, especially high in subarctic or arctic ecosystems.

Friday, June 10, 2016
Professor Bartlett is an Associate Professor of Chemistry and serves as Associate Director at the Energy Institute, working in inorganic material synthesis. Bartlett’s research focuses on two main areas of renewable energy: investigating artificial photosynthesis for the purpose of solar conversion, and newer, more efficient batteries. The solar conversion team uses their knowledge of inorganic materials for the purpose of investigating catalysts able to perform the complex series of biochemical reactions that leaves use to convert water into oxygen. Bartlett’s team is investigating ways to implement Magnesium, which is more abundant and more energy dense than Lithium, in rechargeable batteries.

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