News

 

Wednesday, October 01, 2014

University of Michigan Energy Institute External Advisory Board member Mark Finley will present the BP Energy Outlook 2035, BP’s view on the “most likely” trajectory for the world’s energy production, consumption, and trade—for all countries and all forms of energy—to 2035.

finley
Monday, September 29, 2014

We are pleased to solicit proposals for the next round of University of Michigan Energy Research Fellows. The theme of the program remains Partnerships for Innovation in Energy. Proposals require a team of two or more PIs in sustainable energy science, technology, and policy.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The motor vehicle is at the cusp of being transformed by two threads of technology advancement. One is electrification, replacing gasoline and other liquid fuels with the direct use of electrons, enabling cars to plug in for some or all of their power. The other is intelligence, relieving humans of the error-prone task of driving through the connectivity, sensing and increasing automation, leading to vehicles that will one day drive themselves.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Is nuclear energy “sustainable”? Certainly it’s not categorized as such in any federal definition of the term. Nuclear power is not ballyhooed in pro-renewable montages of solar panels and wind turbines. The nuclear industry receives none of the tax incentives renewables do. But the argument for nuclear energy as an important part of any large-scale sustainable energy plan is a powerful one, and an urgent one to explore as climate change becomes an ever more pressing reality.

Thursday, September 04, 2014

Officials from the U.S. Department of Energy, China’s Ministry of Science and Technology, faculty and students from the University of Michigan- led Clean Energy Research Center- Clean Vehicle Consortium (CERC-CVC) and industry partners met in Ann Arbor on August 11th and 12th to review progress on the initiative's joint clean vehicle energy research projects.  

Monday, August 04, 2014

ANN ARBOR – The American shale gas boom has the potential to revitalize domestic manufacturing, and a new report from a University of Michigan-led panel recommends steps to make that happen in a responsible manner.

Those steps include increasing public trust of hydraulic fracturing; monitoring and reducing methane emissions; and using shale gas profits to advance renewable energy technologies, among other efforts.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

This piece was first published on The Hill; see the original here.

No, the proposed Keystone XL pipeline will NOT carry black tar heroin. But whether you think that diluted bitumen from the Canadian oil sands is better or worse than heroin, there may be a lesson from the “war on drugs.” No, I haven’t been smoking anything, although this morning my hybrid did inhale gasoline and exhale CO2, some of whose carbon probably came from Alberta.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Electricity for rainforest villages in Gabon. Tent fabric that harvests solar energy for nomadic people in Kazakhstan. A modular greenhouse and fish farm in an unused industrial building in Highland Park, Michigan.

These are some of the goals and possibilities a team of 17 researchers will pursue with a new $3 million Third Century Initiative Global Challenges grant from the University of Michigan.

Monday, July 14, 2014

In case you missed them, below you'll find a digest of summer stories featuring work and commentary by Energy Institute Faculty Affiliates. 

Will EPA carbon rules push Michigan harder on clean energy? -MidWest Energy News

A policymaking storm is brewing in Michigan as state officials and lawmakers simultaneously devise a plan to comply with proposed federal carbon rules and also revisit the state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard that expires next year.

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Renewable Portfolio Standards- the percentage of a given energy portfolio made up of renewable power sources- are a contentious issue in many states. In this blog entry, University of Michigan researcher Jeremiah Johnson describes his new study, which will describe in detail the various costs and benefits of adding more renewables to Michigan’s energy mix.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

No matter what their income bracket, American consumers all express an equal degree of “personal worry” about the impact of energy use on the environment, according to the newest findings of the University of Michigan Energy Survey. A joint effort of the U-M Energy Institute and Institute for Social Research, the quarterly survey gauges consumer perceptions and beliefs about key energy-related concerns including affordability, reliability and impact on the environment.

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