News tagged with "Policy and Social Impact"

 

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

The University of Michigan Energy Institute (UMEI), in conjunction with the Michigan Institute for Teaching and Research in Economics (MITRE), is hosting a Fall 2014 conference on economic and policy research that addresses energy use in the transportation sector and its environmental implications. The objective is to bring scholars at the frontier of transportation and energy economics research together with practitioners from industry and government to exchange ideas and research findings.

The conference features an outstanding selection of papers that cover topics including: 

Monday, August 04, 2014

ANN ARBOR – The American shale gas boom has the potential to revitalize domestic manufacturing, and a new report from a University of Michigan-led panel recommends steps to make that happen in a responsible manner.

Those steps include increasing public trust of hydraulic fracturing; monitoring and reducing methane emissions; and using shale gas profits to advance renewable energy technologies, among other efforts.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Electricity for rainforest villages in Gabon. Tent fabric that harvests solar energy for nomadic people in Kazakhstan. A modular greenhouse and fish farm in an unused industrial building in Highland Park, Michigan.

These are some of the goals and possibilities a team of 17 researchers will pursue with a new $3 million Third Century Initiative Global Challenges grant from the University of Michigan.

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Renewable Portfolio Standards- the percentage of a given energy portfolio made up of renewable power sources- are a contentious issue in many states. In this blog entry, University of Michigan researcher Jeremiah Johnson describes his new study, which will describe in detail the various costs and benefits of adding more renewables to Michigan’s energy mix.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

No matter what their income bracket, American consumers all express an equal degree of “personal worry” about the impact of energy use on the environment, according to the newest findings of the University of Michigan Energy Survey. A joint effort of the U-M Energy Institute and Institute for Social Research, the quarterly survey gauges consumer perceptions and beliefs about key energy-related concerns including affordability, reliability and impact on the environment.

Monday, May 19, 2014

The University of Michigan Energy Institute, in conjunction with the Michigan Institute for Teaching and Research in Economics (MITRE), is planning a fall 2014 conference on economics and policy research on energy use in the transportation sector. The conference objective is to bring together scholars at the frontier of transportation and energy economics research with practitioners from industry and government to exchange ideas and research findings. We invite interested researchers to submit papers for presentation at the conference. 

Thursday, March 20, 2014

ANN ARBOR—Consumers, on average, believe home energy bills would have to nearly double before forcing them to make lifestyle changes to save on costs, according to a new University of Michigan survey.

Conducted for the first time last fall, the U-M Energy Survey found that consumers anticipate a proportionally greater rise in home energy bills than in the price of gasoline—30 percent for home energy versus 15 percent for gasoline—over the next five years.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Shale gas is changing the American energy economy at a breakneck pace, and its rapid, widespread domestic utilization is redefining the questions our government must address about energy security, policy and the environment. Shale gas as an energy source poses a huge potential boon to American manufacturers of all stripes, but the relationship between the shale gas boom and U.S manufacturing competitiveness needs clearer understanding.

Friday, January 24, 2014

The New York Times posted an article today entitled Industry Awakens to the Threat of Climate Change, describing how Coke, Nike, the World Bank and even the tycoons in Davos are looking at the physical impacts of climate change as a business risk with real dollars attached to them in the form of lost resources.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Autonomous "robot" vehicles that can drive themselves hold great promise for transforming transportation systems across the world. Part of their appeal is the potential to greatly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. Not so fast, notes Bradley Berman in a critical piece on ReadWriteDrive, where he quotes Energy Institute research professor John DeCicco's admonition that technology "doesn't save us from ourselves."