News tagged with "Policy and Social Impact"

 

Monday, December 01, 2014

Mayors from across the Great Lakes region met this fall to discuss a response to this summer’s Lake Erie toxic algae outbreak that shut down the water supply for almost half a million people in Toledo and the surrounding suburbs. Bottled water ran out in stores across the area, and residents fled the city in search of clean water – an option not available to Lake Erie’s diverse and fascinating array of wildlife.

Monday, November 10, 2014

"If the shale-gas revolution succumbs to politics, we have a lot to lose. As a recent report from the University of Michigan notes: “Managed properly, the availability of low-cost shale gas could catalyze a renaissance in U.S. manufacturing, revitalizing the chemical industry and enhancing the global competitiveness of energy-intensive manufacturing sectors such as aluminum, steel, paper, glass and food.”

shale gas report
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Earlier this week, UN Special Rapporteurs visiting Detroit labeled the city’s nearly 27,000 residential water shutoffs as contrary to basic human rights and disproportionately onerous on the city’s poorest and most vulnerable populations. The Rapporteurs drew these conclusions after a weekend of meetings with city officials and residents. 

Friday, October 03, 2014

VIEW A PROGRAM HERE.

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SEE THE CONFERENCE PAPERS HERE.

Thursday, October 02, 2014

Global trade is, by and large, a good thing. Trade helps optimize the allocation of resources (materials, capital, labor, etc.) at the global scale. Today about one third of the global GDP comes from international trade. The value of traded goods and services today is about 50 times that of 1970, while the global GDP is only about four times that of 1970.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Is nuclear energy “sustainable”? Certainly it’s not categorized as such in any federal definition of the term. Nuclear power is not ballyhooed in pro-renewable montages of solar panels and wind turbines. The nuclear industry receives none of the tax incentives renewables do. But the argument for nuclear energy as an important part of any large-scale sustainable energy plan is a powerful one, and an urgent one to explore as climate change becomes an ever more pressing reality.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Electricity for rainforest villages in Gabon. Tent fabric that harvests solar energy for nomadic people in Kazakhstan. A modular greenhouse and fish farm in an unused industrial building in Highland Park, Michigan.

These are some of the goals and possibilities a team of 17 researchers will pursue with a new $3 million Third Century Initiative Global Challenges grant from the University of Michigan.

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Renewable Portfolio Standards- the percentage of a given energy portfolio made up of renewable power sources- are a contentious issue in many states. In this blog entry, University of Michigan researcher Jeremiah Johnson describes his new study, which will describe in detail the various costs and benefits of adding more renewables to Michigan’s energy mix.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

No matter what their income bracket, American consumers all express an equal degree of “personal worry” about the impact of energy use on the environment, according to the newest findings of the University of Michigan Energy Survey. A joint effort of the U-M Energy Institute and Institute for Social Research, the quarterly survey gauges consumer perceptions and beliefs about key energy-related concerns including affordability, reliability and impact on the environment.

Monday, May 19, 2014

The University of Michigan Energy Institute, in conjunction with the Michigan Institute for Teaching and Research in Economics (MITRE), is planning a fall 2014 conference on economics and policy research on energy use in the transportation sector. The conference objective is to bring together scholars at the frontier of transportation and energy economics research with practitioners from industry and government to exchange ideas and research findings. We invite interested researchers to submit papers for presentation at the conference. 

Thursday, March 20, 2014

ANN ARBOR—Consumers, on average, believe home energy bills would have to nearly double before forcing them to make lifestyle changes to save on costs, according to a new University of Michigan survey.

Conducted for the first time last fall, the U-M Energy Survey found that consumers anticipate a proportionally greater rise in home energy bills than in the price of gasoline—30 percent for home energy versus 15 percent for gasoline—over the next five years.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Shale gas is changing the American energy economy at a breakneck pace, and its rapid, widespread domestic utilization is redefining the questions our government must address about energy security, policy and the environment. Shale gas as an energy source poses a huge potential boon to American manufacturers of all stripes, but the relationship between the shale gas boom and U.S manufacturing competitiveness needs clearer understanding.

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