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Friday, August 05, 2016

Clinton walks fine line on carbon tax

The Hill, feat. Barry Rabe

Hillary Clinton’s campaign is leaving the door open to supporting a carbon tax, hinting that the Democratic nominee could eventually back the controversial idea.

Statements from top campaign officials made during the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia could endear her to environmental activists who are pressing her to adopt more of the progressive positions of primary rival Bernie Sanders — a vocal carbon tax supporter.

Friday, July 29, 2016

As corn devours U.S. prairies, Greens reconsider biofuel mandate

Bloomberg Politics, feat. John DeCicco

Environmentalists who once championed biofuels as a way to cut pollution are now turning against a U.S. program that puts renewable fuels in cars, citing higher-than-expected carbon dioxide emissions and reduced wildlife habitat.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Environmentalists who once championed biofuels as a way to cut pollution are now turning against a U.S. program that puts renewable fuels in cars, citing higher-than-expected carbon dioxide emissions and reduced wildlife habitat.

More than a decade after conservationists helped persuade Congress to require adding corn-based ethanol and other biofuels to gasoline, some groups regret the resulting agricultural runoff in waterways and conversion of prairies to cropland -- improving the odds that lawmakers might seek changes to the program next year.

"The big green groups that got invested in biofuels are tacitly realizing the blunder," said John DeCicco, a research professor at the University of Michigan Energy Institute who previously focused on automotive strategies at the Environmental Defense Fund. "It’s really hard for the people who really -- shall we say -- hate oil viscerally, to think that this alternative that we’ve been promoting is today worse than oil."

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

As part of the U-M Energy Survey’s ongoing reports regarding the affordability of energy, this brief focuses on the newest wave of data through April 2016. We measure American consumers' views of their energy costs with two affordability indices, one for home energy and the other for gasoline. Each index is based on the costs that consumers say they would find unaffordable compared to their actual energy costs—that is, their own home energy bills and the national average price of gasoline—during the month they were surveyed.

Monday, July 25, 2016

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today has selected Argonne National Laboratory to lead a consortium of university, private sector and national laboratory partners for a new, medium- and heavy-duty truck technical track under the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) Truck Research Utilizing Collaborative Knowledge (TRUCK) program.

The multidisciplinary consortium, includes Cummins Inc., Freightliner Custom Chassis Corporation, Ohio State University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Purdue University, and the University of Michigan. 

Friday, July 22, 2016

Coal plant shutdowns are the beginning of the end of an era

Michigan Radio, feat. Mark Barteau

Consumers Energy in April closed seven of its coal-burning units.

DTE Energy plans to shut eight of its coal-burning units by the year 2023.

Mark Barteau is Director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.  He says eventually, coal is going away because natural gas, wind and solar are more cost-effective - as well as being better for public health and the planet.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Consumers Energy in April closed seven of its coal-burning units.

DTE Energy plans to shut eight of its coal-burning units by the year 2023.

Mark Barteau is Director of the University of Michigan Energy Institute.  He says eventually, coal is going away because natural gas, wind and solar are more cost-effective - as well as being better for public health and the planet.

Friday, July 15, 2016

The future of biofuel isn’t corn-it’s algae

Pacific Standard, feat. John DeCicco

When they hear “biofuel,” people tend to assume you’re talking about corn. That makes sense, given that corn is anticipated to provide 80 percent of this year’s ethanol production — much more, say, than algae — until we consider a few numbers.

Friday, July 08, 2016

The Democrats’ climate change conundrum

The Christian Science Monitor, feat. Barry Rabe

Climate change is a top liberal priority, but that very urgency is making the issue divisive as much as unifying for Democrats.

A wide rift has opened over a basic question: Just how ambitious should the Democratic Party be in trying to reduce carbon emissions and stabilize Earth’s climate?  

Friday, July 01, 2016

Here’s what your July 4 road trip means for the climate

Climate Central, feat. John DeCicco

When an expected record-breaking 36 million Americans take their holiday road trips this Fourth of July weekend, they’ll be part of what is quickly becoming our nation’s biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions — transportation.

Thursday, June 30, 2016
Imagine you have planted a big garden, from seed, in your backyard to supplement your family’s diet. Maybe you will sell the extra vegetables at the farmer’s market. It’s hot, time-consuming work, but it’s growing well, and every day you think about the dinners you’ll cook for your family and friends, or what you’ll purchase with the money you make. But you’re not the only one noticing your garden, and a neighborhood rabbit starts nibbling on it. You buy live-capture traps, or maybe you build a fence. You try to save your plants, but the rabbit keeps coming back. Now imagine that the rabbit is 15,400 pounds.
Friday, June 24, 2016

Volkswagen agrees to pay billions to drivers over emissions scandal

The Washington Post, feat. John DeCicco

Volkswagen has agreed to pay $10.2 billion to settle its U.S. emissions scandal case, according to the Associated Press, citing two anonymous people briefed on the matter, in what would be one of the largest payouts by an automaker in history.

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