News

 

Monday, March 20, 2017

When President Trump traveled to Michigan last week to announce that his administration will reevaluate (and almost certainly weaken) a key environmental achievement of the past decade —new fuel economy and greenhouse gas standards for cars and light trucks — he alleged that “industry-killing regulations” had contributed to a loss of jobs in the U.S. automobile sector. The truth is, however, that there is no factual basis for the claim that stricter standards have killed jobs. There is, however, abundant evidence that these regulations have saved Americans billions of dollars at the pump, bolstered U.S. energy independence, fostered automotive innovation, and led to major reductions in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Trump budget blueprint eviscerates energy programs

Climate Central, feat. Mark Barteau

The White House’s proposed “America First” budget forcefully kicks many federal climate-related energy programs to the curb, representing a possible turn away from renewable energy and a broad disinvestment in the research and development needed to transform the U.S. energy system into one better able to adapt to climate change.

Friday, March 10, 2017

What’s driving Exxon’s big Gulf Coast investments?

The Christian Science Monitor, feat. UMEI shale gas report and Barry Rabe

Friday, March 03, 2017

Out-of-this-world research in new ACS journal

American Chemical Society, feat. Joel Blum

Coming soon from ACS Publications, the new, peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary journal ACS Earth and Space Chemistry aims to unite the diverse and global community of scientists who explore the complex chemical nature of materials and processes that occur on Earth, within our solar system, and in the universe beyond. The journal will encompass high-impact basic and applied research in the fields of geochemistry, atmospheric and marine chemistry, 

Friday, February 24, 2017

Stabilizing battery storage

University of Michigan News, feat. Melanie Sanford

An issue that has long plagued renewable energy facilities is how to efficiently store energy collected from sun or wind.

Now, University of Michigan and University of Utah chemists have developed an energy-storing molecule that is 1,000 times more stable than current compounds, potentially leading to a longer-lived, more efficient battery.

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

An issue that has long plagued renewable energy facilities is how to efficiently store energy collected from sun or wind.

Now, University of Michigan and University of Utah chemists have developed an energy-storing molecule that is 1,000 times more stable than current compounds, potentially leading to a longer-lived, more efficient battery.

The researchers are working to develop industrial-scale batteries that can store large amounts of energy for deployment when the sun sets or the wind stops blowing.

Friday, February 17, 2017

New moves on American wind power

WBUR, feat. Mark Barteau

California was early to wind power. Then the Midwest and beyond – Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, Illinois. Texas is huge -- number one. Now, the eastern seaboard is jumping in with offshore wind power generation. The turbines are turning out there. Big new deals are inked. The new administration in Washington is talking coal and oil pipelines. But renewables are surging. Where does the American energy mix go, between markets, policy and climate change? This hour On Point, energy in a windstorm.

Friday, February 10, 2017

Racing against the clock, UM scientists look for new ways to remove carbon dioxide from atmosphere

Michigan Radio, feat. John DeCicco

According to NASA, 2016 was the warmest year since record-keeping began in 1880. It was the third straight year to break the record for global average temperatures.

Around the world, governments, businesses and individuals are taking steps to reverse this trend.

Friday, February 03, 2017

Search for the Super Battery

PBS (NOVA), feat. Levi Thompson, Jeff Sakamoto, Neil Dasgupta and Battery Lab Manager Greg Less

Explore the hidden world of energy storage and its potential to unlock a greener future.

Watch Video

Keystone XL and the Dakota Access Pipeline Controversies explained

The Verge, feat. Mark Barteau

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

This winter, the Battery Lab is expanding to accommodate solid-state battery research for both external users and in-house researchers. Solid-state batteries promise higher energy density and no chance of catching fire. With more development, they could one day replace lithium ion technology.

Monday, January 30, 2017

The Battery Lab and several U-M energy storage researchers will be featured in "Search for the Super Battery," a PBS Nova special airing Wednesday, February 1 at 9 PM. During the special, host David Pogue interviews U-M professors conducting battery research and builds his own battery with Battery Lab manager Greg Less. 

Friday, January 27, 2017

Most of DOE's home page erased after inauguration

E&E EnergyWire, feat. Barry Rabe

Shortly after President Trump's swearing in Friday, most of the content on the Department of Energy's home page disappeared into the ether.

The changeover was much more abrupt than the transition between presidents George W. Bush and Obama in 2009. Back then, the incoming administration dropped in a photo of the new Energy secretary, Steven Chu, and added a small box giving an overview of Obama's energy plan. (See the before and after.)

Pages