News

 

Friday, January 10, 2014

Fuel economy must improve 57 percent in order for light-duty vehicles to match the current energy efficiency of commercial airline flights, says a University of Michigan researcher.

Michael Sivak, a research professor at the U-M Transportation Research Institute, examined recent trends in the amount of energy needed to transport a person a given distance in a light-duty vehicle (cars, SUVs, pickups and vans) or on a scheduled airline flight. His analysis measured BTU per person mile from 1970 to 2010.

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Three pairs of researchers will be reaching across an ocean this year to spark collaborative energy projects with the receipt of University of Michigan – Ben Gurion University of the Negev Collaboration on Energy Research grants.

The catch? The projects have to feature a research team from each university, working jointly on projects related to global energy security. Teams could choose to focus on one of three topics: photovoltaics and solar technology, liquid fuels and engine combustion, or thermoelectricity, materials, and devices.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Autonomous "robot" vehicles that can drive themselves hold great promise for transforming transportation systems across the world. Part of their appeal is the potential to greatly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. Not so fast, notes Bradley Berman in a critical piece on ReadWriteDrive, where he quotes Energy Institute research professor John DeCicco's admonition that technology "doesn't save us from ourselves." 

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

The University of Michigan Regents resolved in 1948 that: “…the University of Michigan create a War Memorial Center to explore the ways and means by which the potentialities of atomic energy may become a beneficent influence in the life of man, to be known as the Phoenix Project of the University of Michigan.” To this end, the Advisory Board of the Michigan Memorial Phoenix Project administers a seed-funding program for research groups developing proposals for external support.

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

At the Energy Institute Symposium, a great selection of University of Michigan graduate student showcased their work in the Energy Institute’s thrust areas, including carbon-free energy sources; energy storage and utilization; transportation and fuels; and energy policy, economics and societal impact. A special thanks to all the students that submitted nearly 50 posters highlighting the depth and breadth of energy research at the University of Michigan. After much deliberation, the winning posters from the the Energy Institute Symposium were chosen:

Thursday, October 17, 2013

The University of Michigan Energy Institute announced on October 14 th 2013 the addition of 11 members to its External Advisory Board. The new members met with existing board members, Energy Institute staff, and university leadership for their first meeting after the Institute’s fall symposium on October 15th.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

A unique $8 million battery lab at U-M will enable industry and university researchers to collaborate on developing cheaper and longer lasting energy-storage devices in the heart of the U.S. auto industry. With support from the Michigan Economic Development Corp., Ford Motor Co. and the university, it will be housed at the U-M Energy Institute. Initial support for the lab includes $5 million from the Michigan Economic Development Corp., $2.1 million from Ford Motor Co. and roughly $900,000 from the College of Engineering.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

MLive reports on the decommissioning of the Ford Nuclear Reactor and the planned $11.4 million renovation of the building. “The reactor is in its last stage of decommissioning, according to a memo from U-M Chief Financial Officer Tim Slottow to the Board of Regents. Regents will vote on whether to approve the project during a 3 p.m. Thursday meeting at the Michigan Union.”

The full article is available at the link

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Our Energy Future: Change, Challenge, and Opportunity

America’s energy sourcing has changed dramatically over the past five years. With guest speakers from industry, academia and government, this symposium will explore the ripple effect this change produces on the global economy, the pursuit of viable renewables, the evolution of energy providers, and the American environmental, political, and transportation landscape. This event will also serve to dedicate the recently completed, LEED-Gold certified home of the Energy Institute. REGISTER HERE.

Thursday, September 05, 2013

ANN ARBOR—University of Michigan researchers today released seven technical reports that together form the most comprehensive Michigan-focused resource on hydraulic fracturing, the controversial natural gas and oil extraction process commonly known as fracking.

The studies, totaling nearly 200 pages, examine seven critical topics related to the use of hydraulic fracturing in Michigan, with an emphasis on high-volume methods: technology, geology and hydrogeology, environment and ecology, public health, policy and law, economics, and public perceptions.

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Our Energy Future: Change, Challenge and Opportunity
Monday, October 14, 2013

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Our Energy Future: Change, Challenge and Opportunity

Monday, October 14, 2013

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