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Wednesday, October 30, 2013

At the Energy Institute Symposium, a great selection of University of Michigan graduate student showcased their work in the Energy Institute’s thrust areas, including carbon-free energy sources; energy storage and utilization; transportation and fuels; and energy policy, economics and societal impact. A special thanks to all the students that submitted nearly 50 posters highlighting the depth and breadth of energy research at the University of Michigan. After much deliberation, the winning posters from the the Energy Institute Symposium were chosen:

Thursday, October 17, 2013

The University of Michigan Energy Institute announced on October 14 th 2013 the addition of 11 members to its External Advisory Board. The new members met with existing board members, Energy Institute staff, and university leadership for their first meeting after the Institute’s fall symposium on October 15th.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

A unique $8 million battery lab at U-M will enable industry and university researchers to collaborate on developing cheaper and longer lasting energy-storage devices in the heart of the U.S. auto industry. With support from the Michigan Economic Development Corp., Ford Motor Co. and the university, it will be housed at the U-M Energy Institute. Initial support for the lab includes $5 million from the Michigan Economic Development Corp., $2.1 million from Ford Motor Co. and roughly $900,000 from the College of Engineering.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

MLive reports on the decommissioning of the Ford Nuclear Reactor and the planned $11.4 million renovation of the building. “The reactor is in its last stage of decommissioning, according to a memo from U-M Chief Financial Officer Tim Slottow to the Board of Regents. Regents will vote on whether to approve the project during a 3 p.m. Thursday meeting at the Michigan Union.”

The full article is available at the link

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Our Energy Future: Change, Challenge, and Opportunity

America’s energy sourcing has changed dramatically over the past five years. With guest speakers from industry, academia and government, this symposium will explore the ripple effect this change produces on the global economy, the pursuit of viable renewables, the evolution of energy providers, and the American environmental, political, and transportation landscape. This event will also serve to dedicate the recently completed, LEED-Gold certified home of the Energy Institute. REGISTER HERE.

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Our Energy Future: Change, Challenge and Opportunity
Monday, October 14, 2013

Thursday, September 05, 2013

Our Energy Future: Change, Challenge and Opportunity

Monday, October 14, 2013

Thursday, September 05, 2013

ANN ARBOR—University of Michigan researchers today released seven technical reports that together form the most comprehensive Michigan-focused resource on hydraulic fracturing, the controversial natural gas and oil extraction process commonly known as fracking.

The studies, totaling nearly 200 pages, examine seven critical topics related to the use of hydraulic fracturing in Michigan, with an emphasis on high-volume methods: technology, geology and hydrogeology, environment and ecology, public health, policy and law, economics, and public perceptions.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Based on results from his recent study, the Energy Institute’s John DeCicco has authored an article for Yale’s Environment 360 blog. This thought-provoking piece opens:

Every U.S. president since Ronald Reagan has backed programs to develop alternative transportation fuels. But there are better ways to foster energy independence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions than using subsidies and mandates to promote politically favored fuels.

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Using a community of fungus and genetically modified E. coli, a Michigan Engineering professor has developed a way to turn corn stalks and leaves into biofuel. The process breaks down waste plant materials into a sugar, which is then turned into isobutanol. Professor Nina Lin and her team argue that their isobutanol could be better than ethanol and other biofuels because it can be dropped into the fuel tank or pipeline without any disruption or corrosion.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

The Energy Institute is pleased to announce a new round of Partnerships for Innovation in Sustainable Energy Technologies (PISET) funding. This program seeds new interdisciplinary research programs in sustainable energy science, technology, and policy with funding for a University of Michigan Sustainable Energy Research Fellowship. Successful proposals will combine innovative research plans with concrete timelines for establishing independent funding. Full information is available here.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Nina Lin and Neil Marsh met at an Energy Institute-hosted symposium three years ago. Both were interested in biofuels, but their research backgrounds are substantially different: Nina Lin is an assistant professor of Chemical Engineering, and Marsh is a professor in the Chemistry Department and of Biological Chemistry at the Medical School.

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