Clean Transportation

As the world’s largest automobile markets, the United States and China lead the world in oil consumption, importing more than half the petroleum they consume. The CERC-Clean Vehicles Consortium seeks to reduce this oil consumption by supporting the joint research of the nations’ leading experts in clean vehicle technologies. The University of Michigan’s Prof. Huei Peng and Tsinghua University’s Prof. Minggao Ouyang lead this effort.

CERC logo
Friday, January 24, 2014

Frank Markus of Motor Trend magazine explains why every carbon molecule in a liquid biofuel, such as ethanol or biodiesel, can't be counted "as an ecological freebie." He reports on the debate about the Renewable Fuel Standard that took place during a panel discussion at this year's Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Government-Industry Meeting in Washington, DC.

Monday, November 24, 2014

Electric cars have been the future of transportation for nearly a century, and despite a flock of new entries, the battery-powered segment of the auto market remains a narrow niche.

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

At the close of this week's Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) trade summit in Beijing, President Barack Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping pledged to cut greenhouse gas emissions and detailed an agreement that includes a renewed five-year commitment to supporting clean vehicle research efforts via the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center.

CERC logo
Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The motor vehicle is at the cusp of being transformed by two threads of technology advancement. One is electrification, replacing gasoline and other liquid fuels with the direct use of electrons, enabling cars to plug in for some or all of their power. The other is intelligence, relieving humans of the error-prone task of driving through the connectivity, sensing and increasing automation, leading to vehicles that will one day drive themselves.

Thursday, September 04, 2014

Officials from the U.S. Department of Energy, China’s Ministry of Science and Technology, faculty and students from the University of Michigan- led Clean Energy Research Center- Clean Vehicle Consortium (CERC-CVC) and industry partners met in Ann Arbor on August 11th and 12th to review progress on the initiative's joint clean vehicle energy research projects.  

Transportation is one of several major sectors that contribute to climate change. Globally, the sector's roughly 25% share of man-made carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is similar to its share of energy consumption. Because liquid fuels are so well suited for powering cars, trucks, boats and aircraft, transportation is uniquely reliant on oil, which is the best natural resource for producing liquid fuels. 

Monday, March 18, 2013

This National Research Council (NRC) report assesses the potential to achieve twin goals of reducing petroleum use and cutting greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from U.S. cars and light trucks to 80 percent below the 2005 level by 2050.

NAS Transitions to Alternative Vehicles and Fuels report
Wednesday, September 01, 2010

ABSTRACT.  Improving the fuel efficiency of automobiles (cars and light trucks) is an important means of addressing transportation oil demand and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This report examines the efficiency attainable through evolutionary changes in U.S. automobiles that have fueling characteristics as well as performance, size and other attributes similar to those of today. The analysis combines results from previous engineering studies of powertrain efficiency and load reduction with new examinations of rates of technology change and cost reduction.

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