Energy Efficiency

Thursday, December 26, 2013

Autonomous "robot" vehicles that can drive themselves hold great promise for transforming transportation systems across the world. Part of their appeal is the potential to greatly improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions. Not so fast, notes Bradley Berman in a critical piece on ReadWriteDrive, where he quotes Energy Institute research professor John DeCicco's admonition that technology "doesn't save us from ourselves." 

The Hydrogen Energy Technology Laboratory (HETL) supports efforts to the discover and develop materials, processes and systems that have the potential to significantly increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of producing hydrogen from domestic natural resources including research on photoelectrochemical, thermochemical and fuel processing systems, enhance our ability to conveniently and inexpensively store large amounts of hydrogen including research on advanced chemical storage systems, and improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of devices used to convert hydrogen into electrical a

JCESR is a major research partnership that integrates government, academic, and industrial researchers from many disciplines to overcome critical scientific and technical barriers and create new breakthrough energy storage technology.​

UMEI/ JCESR projects include:

Chemical Transformations

Deposition/Dissolution Theory: Katsuyo Thornton

New Electrolytes Design for Enhanced Stability and Peroxide Growth Control: Don Siegel

Meta Anode Modification Deposition/Dissolution Dynamics: Emmanuelle Marquis

jcesr

Dedicated in Fall 2013 and currently nearing completion, the Battery Fabrication and Characterization User Facility is a space developed in cooperation with the Michigan Economic Development Corporation and Ford Motor Company. This lab will enable industry and university researchers to collaborate on developing cheaper and longer lasting energy-storage devices in the heart of the U.S. auto industry. The new facility — for prototyping, testing and analyzing batteries and the materials that go into them — promises to be a key enabler for Southeast Michigan's battery supply chain.

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Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Three pairs of researchers will be reaching across an ocean this year to spark collaborative energy projects with the receipt of University of Michigan – Ben Gurion University of the Negev Collaboration on Energy Research grants.

The catch? The projects have to feature a research team from each university, working jointly on projects related to global energy security. Teams could choose to focus on one of three topics: photovoltaics and solar technology, liquid fuels and engine combustion, or thermoelectricity, materials, and devices.

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