Vehicles and Transportation

As the world’s largest automobile markets, the United States and China lead the world in oil consumption, importing more than half the petroleum they consume. The CERC-Clean Vehicles Consortium seeks to reduce this oil consumption by supporting the joint research of the nations’ leading experts in clean vehicle technologies. The University of Michigan’s Prof. Huei Peng and Tsinghua University’s Prof. Minggao Ouyang lead this effort.

Thursday, February 04, 2016

This report is authored by U-M Department of Economics PhD student Alecia Cassidy. The energy efficiency gap is the failure of consumers or producers to make energy efficiency investments that would seemingly save money or increase profits. The phenomenon is important to understand, because if it exists and reflects irrational decisions on the part of consumers or firms, then policy intervention might be warranted. This report examines evidence for the energy efficiency gap in the automobile industry, and ultimately finds that the evidence is inconclusive. Three general approaches were employed: survey research, reduced-form analysis, and discrete choice modeling. Survey research finds evidence of an energy efficiency gap. Reduced-form analyses find no energy efficiency gap. The results of discrete choice models differ, with some finding evidence of an energy efficiency gap and others finding no evidence. 

Monday, January 11, 2016

Huei Peng has been named director of U-M's Mobility Transformation Center, an interdisciplinary research unit of the U-M Office of Research, and Carrie Morton has been appointed deputy director of the MTC.

Peng is the Roger L. McCarthy Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and he has served as associate director of MTC since its launch in 2013. His research focuses on the design and control of electrified vehicles, and connected and automated vehicles.

Friday, January 08, 2016

The problem in the boom in auto sales*

The Washington Post, featuring Michael Sivak

Jan
11
10:30 AM to 11:30 AM

Please join the Department of Materials Science in welcoming guest speaker Professor Dario R. Dekel, who will talk about Alkaline Anion Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. 

Monday, December 21, 2015

American consumers have been enjoying Christmas since July – that is, July 2014, when the average price for all grades of gasoline peaked at US$3.75 per gallon, according to the Energy Information Administration. Since then, prices have declined substantially, as every motorist knows: to $2.90 by Thanksgiving 2014 and to $2.14 as we approach the end of 2015. In many parts of the country, the price of regular gasoline is well below $2 per gallon today.

Energy Information Administration.

Monday, December 07, 2015

On November 30, as the Paris international climate conference was getting underway, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a long-overdue update of Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requirements. Originally established in 2005 and then greatly expanded by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, the RFS mandates increasing use of ethanol, biodiesel and other biofuels in America's cars and trucks.

Friday, November 20, 2015

Should the US end the ethanol mandate?

Wall Street Journal, feat. John DeCicco

The Renewable Fuel Standard, otherwise known as the ethanol mandate, requires refiners to blend an increasing amount of biofuels into the U.S. gasoline supply each year.

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

ANN ARBOR—Could vehicles that communicate with each other and their surroundings, helping drivers avoid crashes, also save energy?

The University of Michigan is working with two U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories to study whether connected and automated vehicles could help people drive more efficiently. U-M, with Argonne National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory, won a three-year, $2.7 million grant from DOE to fund the research.

Monday, November 16, 2015

The first North American roads were foot trails- trails that widened, with the centuries, to accommodate horses and then teams. A horse and wagon traveled at an average speed of four miles per hour. Our average travel speed has changed a bit since then, yet many of those same trails- made to offer the least resistance possible for animals two-legged and four- now carry millions of Americans to their destinations. Builders, policy experts, and others who plan and study transportation systems must literally build the future on top of the past.

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