The demand for economically and environmentally-sound energy solutions is urgent and global.

Projects

  • Transportation Energy Innovation

    Transportation energy research at the University of Michigan aims to develop breakthroughs that will enable a FAST transition to low-carbon mobility systems and to inform industry, policymakers and the public about cost-effective ways to mitigate transportation sector CO₂ emissions globally, nationally and regionally.

    Transportation Energy Innovation

    Transportation energy research at the University of Michigan aims to develop breakthroughs that will enable a FAST transition to low-carbon mobility systems and to inform industry, policymakers and the public about cost-effective ways to mitigate transportation sector CO₂ emissions globally, nationally and regionally.

  • University of Michigan Battery Lab

    The Battery Fabrication and Characterization User Facility enables industry and university researchers to develop cheaper and longer lasting energy-storage devices in the heart of the U.S. auto industry.

    University of Michigan Battery Lab

    The Battery Fabrication and Characterization User Facility enables industry and university researchers to develop cheaper and longer lasting energy-storage devices in the heart of the U.S. auto industry.

  • Fastest Path to Zero

    The Fastest Path to Zero Initiative was founded in 2019 when the University of Michigan Energy Institute and the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences partnered to form a cross-campus team of interdisciplinary experts to tackle difficult research questions about how policymakers, researchers, and communities can work together to meet ambitious climate goals in Michigan and across the nation.

    Fastest Path to Zero

    The Fastest Path to Zero Initiative was founded in 2019 when the University of Michigan Energy Institute and the Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences partnered to form a cross-campus team of interdisciplinary experts to tackle difficult research questions about how policymakers, researchers, and communities can work together to meet ambitious climate goals in Michigan and across the nation.

News

  • DOE Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review

    04/06/20

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) will hold its 2020 Annual Merit Review (AMR) virtually on June 1-4, 2020. Visit the AMR webpage for more information and registration. The Annual Merit Review is a key event each year at VTO, which is one of the Sustainable…

  • Wishes for staying healthy

    04/02/20

    We at the U-M Energy Institute hope that all of our colleagues and affiliates are staying safe and healthy in this difficult time. Like many units, UMEI is working remotely under the University of Michigan’s guidelines following Governor Whitmer’s “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order. We are planning the coming year’s…

  • Energy-related events as we approach Earth Day at 50

    02/27/20

    This year is the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day, first held in 1970, and U-M has a wide range of events planned. Everyone should check out the special Earth Day at 50 website that U-M has set up for the occasion. Activities shift into high gear right after…

  • Teach-in on auto efficiency

    02/25/20

    UMEI’s John DeCicco hosted a panel of experts for a teach-in on Automobile Efficiency: Challenges and Opportunities for Addressing a Major Part of CO2 Emissions. This event was held on Monday, March 9, 2020, 12:00 – 2:00 pm, at the School of Public Health as part of the Commemorative Week of…

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Faculty in the News

Commenting on recent news about record-low levels of coal burning for electricity production, Ford School of Public Policy professor Catherine Hausman pointed how “It’s pretty clear that the decline in coal use is sustained, it’s big and it’s real, and it’s coming mostly from the big drop in natural gas prices we’ve seen in the last decade.” The trends marking the decline are twofold: coal-fired power plants are closing and those that are still in service are operating less often and therefore burning less coal.